News & Results

Waterford Finishes 3rd In $35,700 Qualifier at Live Oak International CSI3*-W

Photo by Erin Gilmore Photography

Photo by Erin Gilmore Photography

As pathfinder in the $35,700 CSI3* Longines World Ranking Competition at the 2019 Live Oak International CSI3*-W, Lauren Hough and Waterford led for more than half the opening speed class with a time of 65.68 seconds.

“I thought my horse jumped a very good round,” said Hough. “Going first, you never really know. If I had gone later there were a couple places I could’ve gone a bit quicker, but I’m thrilled.”

#AskHough: Where are your favorite places to ride and compete?

Photo via NF

Photo via NF

The next question in the #AskHough series is: “Where are your favorite places to ride and compete?”

Aachen is probably my most favorite outdoor show, and Geneva is probably my most favorite indoor one. Spruce Meadows in September for the Masters is another favorite. And for riding outside of the competition ring, I’m so lucky in both countries to have amazing facilities where my horses are really happy: Aston Farms in England and Windsome in Wellington, Florida.

Paloma Jumps To Top 3 Finish In $72,000 NetJets Classic CSIO5*

Photo by Alden Corrigan Media for The Competitive Equestrian

Photo by Alden Corrigan Media for The Competitive Equestrian

During the penultimate day of the Longines FEI Jumping Nations Cup™ USA week at the CP Palm Beach Masters CSIO5*, presented by Suncast, a field of 25 international competitors took to the grass at Deeridge Farms for the $72,000 NetJets Classic.

Paloma jumped two nice rounds to finish on the podium at 3rd.

“Paloma is a new ride for me,” said Hough. “She is a very quick horse and she has been successful with other riders. I wanted to take a shot . Hopefully we have a great future together.”

#AskHough: Do you have any advice for handling anxiety at shows?

Photo by Tiffany van Halle

Photo by Tiffany van Halle

The first question in the Q&A #AskHough series is: Do you have any advice for handling anxiety at shows?

I think practice and repetition always help. Horses can always sense anxiety or nervousness. If you would like your horse to be calm for an important competition, you have to have calmness within you because you don’t want your horse to feel your anxiety. Try to think, "What's best for my horse?" Yes, we all have nerves, but you can learn to channel those into being focused.